Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Meet GDB Graduate JR Quevedo

When John Ross "JR" Quevedo was in class for the first time to receive his new guide dog, he remembers thinking it was like ballroom dancing. "Working with a guide dog has a lot to do with body positioning and foot work, especially on turns," recalls JR. "As a new handler, I practiced every turn in my room while I was at GDB – I danced every night."

JR smiles while kneeling down with his arm around his guide dog Griff (yellow Lab) in front of a cafe in San Francisco.

JR’s mother had been infected with the Rubella virus while pregnant with him, causing his left eye to be totally blind at birth. At three months old, his right eye was able to be saved through surgery; providing him with minimal vision. "I always enjoyed sketching and doodling as a child, said JR. "I attended a regular public school and in class I was never able to see the notes the teacher wrote on the board, so I would usually copy them during lunch break, where I was inches away from the board. I started sketching on my paper and pretended I was taking notes like the other students during class so I wouldn’t stand out – I guess that helped my path of becoming an artist."

JR's digital illustration of a guide dog team looking out at the moon on top of a hill while under a tree.

JR later attended The Art Institute and Academy of Arts in San Francisco, where he majored in graphic design. He is more of graphic illustrator now, with a passion for typography and visual development through storytelling. "I might be visually impaired, but my imagination and storytelling is very much alive," he said. "I draw on paper where my eye is inches away from where I can literally kiss my artwork. Being a digital artist helps because anything can be zoomed in using a computer. I’m inspired by experiences and what I’m surrounded by - I just love to tell stories through illustrations."

JR holds up a post it with his unique typography that says "Everything is cool when you're part of a team" with his guide dog Griff and the ocean in the background.

While being an artist was a cathartic outlet for JR, he was always searching for something more when it came to his mobility and independence. "I’ve been blessed with great family and friends whom I could always count on to help me get around, but I really wanted to gain my independence," he said. "The cane helped, but I didn't like the stigma I felt with it. After reading examples of how a guide dog team works, that’s when I knew that was the missing piece."

JR's cartoon drawing of a young man with a backpack smiling while walking with his guide dog down a path.

JR came to GDB in January 2015 and said he fondly remembers Dog Day. "Griff was dropped off in my room and that’s when I first saw his energetic and affectionate personality – he jumped and went in for a hug the first time he saw me, that is when I knew we were a perfect match. I missed out getting excited to get my license for the first time and being able to drive a car, but I figure that moment of strolling with my guide at first must be the same. Full of joyous anxiousness!"

Shot looking down at JR's red Puma shoes with Griff's red Ruffwear booties and it between them on the pos-it it reads "We are a match."

Over the course of the two-week training, JR worked primarily with GDB Master Licensed Guide Dog Instructor Paolo Pompanin. "Paolo, was just phenomenal," he said. "He had so much knowledge and patience that helped Griff and me succeed. What I admire most about him and the rest of the team of instructors in my class was the relationship that was built. As class went on it felt like we were all becoming friends that got comfortable with each other through humor. That made learning and being in class a lot of fun. I really bonded with my classmates and gained wisdom from all of them."

JR holds up one of his unique typography notes on a post-it that reads "Who I am with you" - his guide dog Griff sits looking at the camera and behind him overlooks San Francisco.

Upon graduating, JR and Griff returned home to San Francisco as a confident team ready to take on the world. "In the short amount of time having Griff on my left side, I’ve gotten to know San Francisco a lot more, said JR. "That’s weird to say after living in the same city for years, but it shows how much I didn’t really want to be out by myself. I have this new confidence to become more of a risk taker and have more initiative now when I'm outside. There is this sense of security knowing Griff is able to see things that I might have missed. People see how cute and well behaved he is and that has taken the negative annotation out of having a disability.  And the best part – it's just the beginning!"

Sweet photo of Griff looking adoringly at the camera with one of JR's post-its that reads "Can't say love, not without you."

JR said that having Griff has brought so much joy into his life, that sometimes the best ways to express those emotions are through illustrations. Currently a freelance designer and illustrator, he said that all of his social media handle names are URBSTERS (Urban Monsters). "I had a hard time showing my personality when I was younger, because everyone would notice first how my eyes looked," he said. "This is why I love drawing monsters that are bubbly and cute, because normally everyone would just judge them as monster first before getting to know who they really are. I just hope people can see my personality before noticing my disability – Griff and my artwork has been a bridge to that."

Beautiful illustration of a young man sitting next to his guide dog facing the sunset (a large red circle).


Friday, June 19, 2015

A Two Career Girl

When Jim Jordan became a GDB Breeder Custodian for Trinity (raised by Don and Kelli Reiter in Seattle, WA), he knew from the very first moment that she truly was an amazing animal. Trinity retired to be Jim’s family pet after a successful breeder career, which included 23 puppies in five litters, one of which is current GDB male breeder, Jenkins.

Jim is an insulin dependent diabetic and had learned of Dogs4Diabetics when he met a fellow diabetic, Crystal Clearwater, and her medical alert dog, Dela. Knowing what an extraordinarily smart and devoted dog Trinity was, Jim decided that he wanted to try to train Trinity himself! He purchased the book How To Train Your Diabetic Alert Dog by Rita Martinez, CPTD-KA, and immediately began the training process. Trinity learned the basics quickly but when Jim hit some stumbling blocks in the later stages of training, he was able to have a few sessions with the author, Ms. Martinez, who lives in Oakley, Ca. The entire training process took the Jim-Trinity team a total of eight months when Trinity was proudly certified as a medical alert dog in March 2014.

Jim, Trinity (yellow Lab wearing her purple scarf and blue jacket), Don & Kelli from last summer’s Fun Day in CA

Trinity is now constantly at Jim’s side to be able to alert him whether they are awake or asleep if his blood sugar goes either too low or too high. It is a tremendous relief for Jim and his family that his faithful companion is always at his side and on the job. Jim hopes that other diabetics, particularly children, will learn of the Dogs4Diabetics program and the Early Alert Canines program to find a gifted animal like Trinity to help make their lives safer and easier.